A Bridge to Africa

by Anne Rother

Good news!

Junge Männer und Frauen vor einem Großstadthintergrund

As I reported earlier this year, we were not quite sure whether our idea to offer a journalistic scholarship would work out. Meanwhile we have received about 25 interesting applications and we are optimistic that there is more to come. That’s good news. Thanks to our supporters out there, the call obviously has found its way to the people we would like to address.

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A Bridge to Africa

by Daniel Felten

It's great to have colleagues who can translate texts into illustrations!

I have just returned from Oman, where I accompanied Geoverbund ABC/J’s student’s excursion. Actually, it was now planned to put the registration form for PASCAL online. However, I could not do everything necessary for it before my departure. So it's always good to have an official deadline that you share with colleagues and an unofficial “very-very-last-it-has-definitely-done-by-this-date” one.

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Zweikommazwei

by Gastblogger

Brain research: “We want to show the whole picture.”

Seeing doesn’t necessarily mean understanding. This brief notion is perhaps the best way of describing the problem that drives many researchers in the field of neuroscience. When imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging emerged in the 1990s, it appeared to be just a matter of time until we understood how speech is processed, sentences formed, and recollections stored in our short- and long-term memories. However, the current estimations of many scientists paint a much more sober picture. To date, hardly any concept from the fields of psychology, philosophy, or sociology can be clearly assigned to biological processes and structures in the brain.

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A Bridge to Africa

by Alissa Aarts

Time for Talents!

As we already pointed out, PASCAL is following the aim of supporting Africa in implementing the latest geo-scientific methods to make food production sustainable and secure. Besides this part of the project, we also want to give all participants of the HPC training and the hackathon as well as everyone else who is interested the opportunity of getting to know Germany as a place for excellent science. Therefore we offer an accompanying programme from November 27-29, 2018 and my main task within this project is to support the planning and organization of this programme.

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A Bridge to Africa

by sdues

Science Bridge – connecting people and knowledge

Based on a common scientific interest, a Science Bridge provides a reciprocal link between individual researchers or their groups, scientific organizations or even countries and geographic regions. The goal is to bring people together, build networks through various activities and start scientific collaborations.

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A Bridge to Africa

by Anne Rother

Making PASCAL glow!

When we got the message that PASCAL had won one of the main awards of the DFG Ideas Competition for International Research Marketing we were excited. But we were also a little bit worried. To make the project known to the African geo-science community as well as to the media – this wouldn’t be a home match for us. No, not at all. This post is about our first communication activities for the project - it's about feelings, learnings and signs of hope ...

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A Bridge to Africa

by Daniel Felten

There's no way around Africa!

Apart from purely science-driven projects, the DFG Ideas Competition offers an ideal opportunity to promote the expertise and know-how of both networks Geoverbund ABC/J and ISMC beyond the existing scientific communities, to combine different assignments and concerns, and to try something completely new to us!

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DocBlog

by Stefanie Hamacher

It's time to say goodbye ... and welcome

In November, we, the doctoral researchers, again elected two new spokespersons who will represent us in several committees for the next year. This means it is time to say goodbye and thank you, but also welcome and good luck! As usual I would like to introduce the new speakers to you or let’s say let them introduce themselves to you. Afterwards I will give you a short overview of the things that are went on in the last months. Before we start with our Newbies, I’d like to mention that this time all our candidates for speakers were internationals, which is a first :) So I am really happy to introduce you to…

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DocBlog

by Stefanie Hamacher

Transferable Skills Subgroup

In April 2017, the first phase of the development process of the Doctoral Researcher and Scientific Advisor Platform (short DocPlatform) has ended. All the results gained in this phase were presented to the project board in May. Getting a very positive feedback there, a final meeting with all the participants of phase one was held at which everyone could inform him/herself about the work done in the other subgroups. This was also the start of the second phase, in which the following target processes shall be acquired: E-recruiting of Docs Identification and registration of all Docs Central monitoring of all Docs Transferable-skills curriculum In this article, I will tell you some more details about the transferable skills subgroup and what it achieved.

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Zweikommazwei

by Marcel Bülow

Ozone Researchers Meet up at Jülich

Be it in its role as a natural UV absorbent, climate gas, or health factor – the ozone concentration in the atmosphere is of interest to society for various reasons. For decades, global measuring programmes have investigated how the ozone content changes due to human influence. Ozone sondes attached to weather balloons, which can reach altitudes of 35 km, are still an indispensable source of data. Forschungszentrum Jülich plays an important role in this context: since 1996, it has been running the World Calibration Center for Ozone Sondes (WCCOS). In early November, calibration measurements for the NASA-headed SHADOZ network took place here.

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Climate Research Taking Off

by Irene Bartolome

Ophelia, my darling! Volume no. 2

As you know, ex-hurricane Ophelia arrived on Monday to Ireland. Following the advise of the Irish meteorological service, we stayed at home, but... we didn't have electricity nor water! Want to know what we did? Keep reading and you may find delicious surprises!

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Climate Research Taking Off

by Cornelia Strube

Ophelia, my darling! Volume no.1

(Ex-)Hurricane Ophelia kept us busy the last days. IEK-7 campaign seem to attract natural catastrophies. Or is it that we are going wherever the weather is exceptional? No-one knows... However, we found ourselfs in the middle of national weather warnings from Sunday midday onwards. According to the NOAA Hurricane Center, Ophelia was the easternmost hurricane in the Northern Atlantic on record. Of course, being the dedicated climate researchers we are, we had to take the chance to probe the hurricane in front of our doorstep.

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Climate Research Taking Off

by Cornelia Strube

Art and a research aircraft

Research aircrafts do not usually fly straight to a point and back, as you would expect for instance a passenger plane to go. Observing flight tracks of such a plane give very funny patterns, hence. See for yourself.

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Climate Research Taking Off

by Cornelia Strube

Follow the air and see what it is doing

One major goal in the WISE campaign is to follow the time evolution of air masses in the UTLS (upper troposphere-lower stratosphere) and to see how they are affected by tropopheric-stratospheric exchange. The latest (and upcoming) research flights are planned to provide an idea of exacty this time evolution. Flight 9 last Saturday was targeting a feature in the West-Atlantic with the plan to probe the same air again in later flights. At the moment, HALO is on its way to catch it now, two days later close to the Norwegian border.

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Climate Research Taking Off

by Irene Bartolome

Nice things to see from a plane

There are some very nice things you can spot from a plane. Not only clouds and the ant farms that actually are cities but also atmospheric phenomena. I have seen for the first time a “Glory” on my way to Ireland. On top, a colleague (Peter Hoor from the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz) took a very nice picture of so-called “Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities” on a research flight with HALO last week. So I just wanted to show you the pictures here and give you a short explanation on what it is.

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