Zweikommazwei

by Gastblogger — 2020-05-14

Wie wird man eigentlich Feuerwehrmann bzw. -frau im Forschungszentrum Jülich?

Das Forschungszentrum Jülich hat eine eigene Feuerwehr. Die rund 100 Kolleginnen und Kollegen der haupt- und nebenberuflichen Werkfeuerwehr übernehmen in erster Linie die Aufgaben, wie man sie auch von kommunalen Feuerwehren kennt. Um die richtigen Kandidatinnen und Kandidaten für den Dienst in Jülich zu identifizieren, ist es üblich, im Rahmen des Bewerbungsverfahrens einen Einstellungstest durchzuführen. In diesem Jahr fand der Einstellungstest Anfang Februar statt. Mit dabei war auch Carina Spiegelmacher, die als Teamleiterin für den Inneren Dienst u. a. für die Aus- und Fortbildung zuständig ist. Für die Jülich Blogs berichtet sie über den aufregenden Tag und gibt Einblicke, was die Anwärter während der Ausbildung, aber auch im nachfolgenden Berufsalltag erwartet.

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Zweikommazwei

by Marcel Bülow — 2020-04-30

Mit der 360-Grad-Kamera auf Tour: Virtueller Rundgang durch die Jülicher Lysimeter-Anlage

Es sind außergewöhnliche Zeiten. Das Forschungszentrum hat komplett auf Basisbetrieb umgestellt und außer einer Notbesetzung vor Ort, sind alle Mitarbeiter im Homeoffice. Videokonferenzen, Abteilungschats oder kooperatives Arbeiten in Dokumenten – mittlerweile hat sich das Arbeiten von zu Hause eingespielt, wie auch die Kollegin Anna Geiger kürzlich beschrieb. Was oftmals fehlt, ist die persönliche Komponente im Büro. Das Gespräch am Morgen, die Wochenendgeschichte während des Mittagessens oder den Austausch zwischendurch, lernt man derzeit mehr und mehr zu schätzen. Auf der anderen Seite findet sich in der häuslichen Ruhe mitunter Gelegenheit, Projekte voranzutreiben, die im normalen Alltag womöglich kürzer kommen. Passend dazu haben wir unseren ersten 360-Grad-Rundgang fertiggestellt. Bilder und Videos dazu hatten wir bereits vor der Corona-Krise aufgenommen. In den vergangenen Wochen entstand nun eine virtuelle Tour durch die Lysimeter-Anlage des Jülicher Instituts für Agrosphärenforschung. Aber der Reihe nach…

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Zweikommazwei

by Gastblogger — 2020-04-29

Nachruf auf Prof. Karl Zilles - Ein Vorbild in der akademischen Lehre und in der Forschung

Von Katrin Amunts - Am 26. April 2020 verstarb unser lieber Freund und hochgeschätzter Kollege, Professor Emeritus Karl Zilles, nach langer und schwerer Krankheit. Karl Zilles war über viele Jahre Direktor des Instituts für Medizin, später des Instituts für Neurowissenschaften und Biophysik und zuletzt des Instituts für Neurowissenschaften und Medizin am Forschungszentrum Jülich. Er leitete lange das C. und O. Vogt Institut für Hirnforschung der Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf und war damit der zweite Institutsleiter nach den beiden Namensgebern, deren große Tradition er zu neuem Leben erweckte.

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Living Lab Energy Campus

by Ellen Kammula — 2020-04-20

Gemeinsam für die Campusenergiewende: Mitarbeiterbeteiligung im LLEC

Das Energiesystem des Forschungszentrums Jülich (FZJ) wird sich im Laufe des Projekts „Living Lab Energy Campus“ (LLEC) fundamental verändern. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass die erfolgreiche Umgestaltung des Energiesystems maßgeblich von der Mitwirkung der Nutzerinnen und Nutzer abhängt. Deshalb ist die Nutzereinbindung ein zentrales Element des LLEC-Projekts, für das wir ein eigenes Projektteam „Engagement und Dissemination“ eingerichtet haben. Hier berichten wir über die Arbeit unseres Teams.

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You and Your Brain

by Anna Geiger — 2020-04-17

Home office in times of COVID-19 in our institute

We are all currently affected by COVID-19 and its implications. Like many other institutes INM-7 has been in the home office for 7 weeks. Here you can read how well it works and what has changed as a result.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-18

Ma Salama!

We are back in Germany – green, rainy, well-organised, toilet paper deprived Germany – oh how we missed you, or did we?! I`ll admit it dealing with the thought that we might not be able to get back was pretty unpleasant, but I can`t say that I felt particularly homesick over the last two weeks and I hope neither did the other fieldtrippers. Letting go of the excursion routine, the great outdoors and the people that surrounded you non-stop is easier said than done. So, to make our transition back into our everyday lifes a bit smoother and to say goodbye to our readers, I am writing one last blog.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-15

A song of bronze and frankincense

Oman is a wealthy state. We have seen various expressions of this wealth in the last two weeks. They come in form of prestigious development projects like the botanical gardens or the university, in form of a rather wasteful usage of water and in form of cheap fuel, I mean when did you last fill you 120 l tank for 45€? For Omani citizens the governmental welfare is almost limitless. There are no taxes, free healthcare, education, and a piece of land to build on for every married adult. All of this wealth pours from a single source: oil. One can discuss the sustainability of this situation, but that is not where I am going with this.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-13

The taste of Oman

When we prepared the lunch for our fieldtrip participants on the first day we triggered a lot of confusion. ‘Is this dinner already?’ (at 1 pm mind you.) ‘No this is lunch.’ ‘WE GET LUNCH?’ Yes indeed, you get lunch. Yes, every day. Three meals a day is apparently unconventional for fieldtrips and I have to admit I gain a few pounds every year, but come on, did you think we would let you starve?! There are fresh veggies, fruit, eggs (oh so many eggs), bread and a number of spreads on the buffet. Dinner embraces the popular concept of ‘Reis mit Scheiß’, whereby ‘Scheiß’ is usually spicy goat or camel or, on meatless days, chicken. But where does all of this come from? How does Oman satisfy its food consumption?

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-12

The White Wadi

Driving off-road is a crucial part of this fieldtrip. We get the Land Cruisers for a reason and the people who drive have the chance to try out a number of different terrains, starting with basic dirt roads, ending with loose sand or gravel. For some of the drivers it`s the first time to leave the safe haven of asphalt and also the first time to handle a 2 ton four-wheel-drive. The fact that there have never been any major driving incidents shows that the off-roading is actually easily learned. Still, there are some tracks that are somewhat tricky.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-10

Faces in the night

Imagine a wadi. A dry river bed, filled with gravel, at the foot of a tower-shaped mountain. A few trees and shrubs grow between the rubble. Night has already fallen, the mountain stands black before the night sky. The full moon is bright enough to see every pebble and every thorny twig. In this wadi there sits a camp right beside a rudimentary dirt road. The camp has a large white truck, a row of cars, some tables, a circle of camping chairs around a campfire and a few scattered tents. The fire is burning, an interrupted card game lays on a boulder and from the boiling pots in the truck`s kitchen comes a smell of roasted chicken, but nobody is there.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-09

To Mars and back

Oman is a desert. Per definition, a desert is an area with less than 250 mm of annual precipitation, which is true for the entire country, except for the highest mountains. Still, I believe that if you ask a random European what a desert looks like, they will not describe the landscapes that we saw the last couple of days. Neither turquoise water pools and hanging gardens nor beaches come to mind when you think of deserts. Instead, they will describe what we are about to experience next: red dunes stretching out to the horizon, hot sand under our feet, an unforgiving sun in a clear blue sky, a landscape so barren of vegetation that you wonder if anything can survive in it.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-07

The Old Men and the Sea

At our beach camp of the last couple of days two things are very obvious. First, Gösta always makes us park in “direction of escape” and second, if you wish to avoid the toilet-tent and instead use the beach - better do it early, otherwise you risk to become amusement to the many fisherman that pass you by on their speedboats.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-05

Spicy with rice

Today we spend the whole day on a terrace. I know what kind of image this sentence probably triggers: armchairs, cold cobblers, homemade lemonade, sunglasses and general relaxation. Forget that! The terrace we are talking about is a marine terrace, so a staircase-shaped coastal landform that is formed through a combination of sea-level variations and land uplift.

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-04

The secret lies in the crust

This fieldtrip is a highly interdisciplinary fieldtrip. In theory, this means that we can all broaden our knowledge about the neighbouring fields of geology, geography, archaeology and ecology. In reality, this means that it is a little different than the fieldtrips our participants are used to. And what happens when you take people out of their known environment and expose them to changed conditions? Nagging! Usually it takes about a week before the geologists start to complain. This year`s geologists seem to be particularly petty, because it took only one day for them to notice ‘we didn`t look at any outcrops yesterday’. (If you read that last bit in a whiny voice, you are correct.)

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Off to the Desert

by Michaela Falkenroth — 2020-03-03

Welcome to Muscat – the capital of mess and the seedling of sustainability

The day has come. In dribs and drabs our newly minted Oman-travellers arrived at the hotel in Muscat. A hotel that conveniently changed its name and 1/4th of its facade over the last couple of months, but otherwise, from staff to breakfast, remained exactly the same. From the standpoint of the arrivals, something else probably changed its facade over the last 24 hours and that is Oman itself. The country went from a blank shape on a map to a real place with character, colours, sounds and smells.

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